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Why do some women like to shop more than others?

Why do some women like to shop more than others?

According to the socio-biologists, women are linked to shopping in the same way that men are linked to sports. Often women’s behavior is explained by something like the “shopping gene “: men are the “hunters” (conquering stuff) and women are the “gatherers” (finding stuff).

How often do women shop in a year?

Across the country, women increased their number of shopping days. Instead of shopping for dry goods twice a year, they were shopping every third or fourth day. In this way, women and department stores paired up to create a profound new cultural environment that openly encouraged women to act on their own desires.

Why do women like to shop at the last minute?

Most men, it seems, shop only reluctantly and at the last minute, especially during the holidays—except perhaps for cars, trucks and big-screen TVs. But women, regardless of the season or the state of the economy, seem drawn to shopping.

Why do people love to shop at stores?

Retailers seduce us into buying an illusory freedom—a freedom that is in fact no freedom at all, only another form of subjugation. Sad to say, modern consumerism creates desire but doesn’t satisfy it.

Why do women shop the way they do?

And this brings us back to shopping, because these instincts may show themselves in our shopping habits. When most women shop, they are in more of a “gathering” mode — browsing from tree to tree (or shop to shop), looking for ripe and nutritious fruit.

Why do men like shopping more than women?

Of course, as with most “pet theories,” I eventually realized that I’m not the only person who has thought of it. In 2009, anthropologists Kruger and Byker found very clear similarities between modern men and women’s shopping habits and our hunter-gatherer past.

Across the country, women increased their number of shopping days. Instead of shopping for dry goods twice a year, they were shopping every third or fourth day. In this way, women and department stores paired up to create a profound new cultural environment that openly encouraged women to act on their own desires.

Most men, it seems, shop only reluctantly and at the last minute, especially during the holidays—except perhaps for cars, trucks and big-screen TVs. But women, regardless of the season or the state of the economy, seem drawn to shopping.