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What insulation was used in the 50s?

What insulation was used in the 50s?

The 1950s – 1970s Another form of insulation that became popular is cellulose. Made of newspaper, cardboard, straw, sawdust, or cotton, cellulose was actually one of the earliest types of insulation. It didn’t become popular until later, however, because it was considered very flammable.

Do old houses have bad insulation?

Classic, older homes may radiate beauty and charm, but they are often uncomfortably drafty – especially during cold months. Unlike today’s airtight homes, many old houses have a natural ventilation system. They “breathe” through air leaks, and houses built before the 1960s were usually not well insulated.

What did old houses use for insulation?

There are three main types: fiberglass, either treated with formaldehyde (made as a by-product of batt manufacturing) or untreated; cellulose, which is about 80 percent ground-up newsprint and 20 percent borate, a mineral added as a fire retardant; and mineral wool.

Did they insulate houses in the 50s?

Many homes built in the early 1950s often featured little in the way of wall insulation. However, when insulation was used, it usually consisted of a product called rock wool or stone (or slag) wool. Still in use today, it’s made by melting down rock and sand and then spinning it together to make an insulating fiber.

What kind of insulation do I need for an older home?

Neighborly lists the steps for installing new foam board insulation in an older home. This is designed for the home’s exterior rather than working inside the walls. You would first need to install a house wrap or vapor barrier to the exterior walls followed by 1-inch foam board insulation.

What kind of wall insulation was used in the early 50s?

This Old House claims that this is a good choice for an interior gut job or if you plan to replace your siding. However, interior foam boards have to be covered with drywall (at least 1/2 inch thick) to be fire-retardant. Fiberglass batts are also good for walls that are gutted down to their studs.

What happens if you add insulation to an old house?

Adding insulation to the walls of an old house without any other precautions can result is rotting walls full of mold under certain circumstances. In other cases, drilling holes in the walls or removing a couple courses of clapboard to blow insulation into the stud bays may work with no problems.

Can a house in Miami be insulated in Michigan?

Your insulation plans should revolve around your climate. After all, you wouldn’t insulate a house in Miami the same as a house in Michigan. I’ve written two detailed posts about how to properly insulate in either a hot or cold which might be a good place to check after getting the basics in this post. Check them out below.

Neighborly lists the steps for installing new foam board insulation in an older home. This is designed for the home’s exterior rather than working inside the walls. You would first need to install a house wrap or vapor barrier to the exterior walls followed by 1-inch foam board insulation.

Adding insulation to the walls of an old house without any other precautions can result is rotting walls full of mold under certain circumstances. In other cases, drilling holes in the walls or removing a couple courses of clapboard to blow insulation into the stud bays may work with no problems.

This Old House claims that this is a good choice for an interior gut job or if you plan to replace your siding. However, interior foam boards have to be covered with drywall (at least 1/2 inch thick) to be fire-retardant. Fiberglass batts are also good for walls that are gutted down to their studs.

What kind of insulation is dangerous to Your House?

How to Identify Dangerous Asbestos Insulation. But asbestos can also be found in some types of loose-fill attic and wall insulation, too. You have no worries if your insulation is in batt form—the type of insulation that may pose a risk is ​loose-fill insulation that is poured loosely into joist or wall stud cavities.